Trying Tsukemen at Mitsuyado Sei-Men

Not to be confused with the now-in-rubbles Blue Wave, Blue Baywalk along Macapagal Boulevard is a haven for good eats and more that’s reminiscent of Bonifacio High Street. With an outdoor strip, patches of green and laidback atmosphere, it sees most action on weekends, when families arrive by the dozen. As for me, it’s a place I frequent only for food because it’s relatively crowd-less on weeknights.

The streets of Japan right in Manila
The streets of Japan right in Manila

Brought to Manila by the UCC Group, I’ve been eyeing Mitsuyado Sei-Men for a while now but it wasn’t until last Friday night that the fiance and I decided to go in. As soon as you step inside the restaurant, you’ll immediately feel like you are in Japan. See the amazing decor that throws a nod to Japan. This is one of the most decked out Japanese restaurants I’ve been to in a while! It looks and feel very authentic, too.

Fail panorama shot :D
Fail panorama shot 😀

The restaurant to visit for a taste of Tsukemen so we had to order one. But what is Tsukemen exactly? Tsukemen is basically noodles with an accompanying sauce. You eat it by dipping noodles into the sauce. It’s just like having ramen, only the sauce is served on the side. We were told we could have this served cold, making it the perfect alternative on days it’s too hot to eat ramen.

Karashi Tsukemen
Karashi Tsukemen

Since we were Tsukemen newbies, it would be a shame to pass up on one. However, we didn’t go for their bestseller–Cheese Sauce Tsukemen. The fiance was craving for something spicy (yes even in this heat) so he chose the Karashi Tsukemen.

Karashi Ramen (Php300)
Karashi Ramen (Php300)

My order was a regular bowl of Karashi Ramen with thin noodles. You can, however, opt for the thicker ones. If you’re not a heavy eater, better choose the thin noodles because I didn’t even get to finish mine. I have to give it to Mitsuyado though because they have big portions. It felt like eating from a bowl of bottomless ramen! Di nababawasan yung noodles. :p My favorite part of my ramen is the broth! It’s ridiculously delicious. One sip and I was sold–a visit in the future is in order.

Ebi Tempura (Php290)
Ebi Tempura (Php290)
Gyoza (Php180)
Gyoza (Php180)

Other than our Karashi dishes, we also sampled their Gyoza (our must-eat at any Japanese restaurant) and Ebi Tempura. The Gyoza I enjoyed but the Tempura not so much. It was more batter than prawn.

Happy and satiated from our wonderful meal, we left Mitsuyado Sei-Men feeling good about spending Php1,200+. It’s a bit on the pricey side but you get your money’s worth here. The service was fast, the staff were attentive and the ambiance topnotch. It’s also a good thing that we saw a group of Japanese businessmen eating here, which is often an indication of how legit a Japanese restaurant is. 🙂


Mitsyuado Sei-Men
Blue Bay Walk, EDSA Cor.,, Diosdado Macapagal Blvd, Pasay, Metro Manila
Tel: (02) 8434329

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